Auction | Two Steve Jobs’ watches for sale on Julien’s Action

Screenshot-2016-02-20-at-3.23.22-PMA febbraio scorso il Seiko al quarzo indossato nientepopodimenoche dal fondatore di Apple, Steve Jobs, nel suo iconico ritratto con il Macintosh sul grembo, ha realizzato in asta la stratosferica cifra di $ 42.500. Il lotto faceva parte di un’asta che includeva diverse altre memorabilia del celebre imprenditore ma il fatto che questo modesto orologio facesse la sua comparsa nei leggendari scatti efftuati da Norman Seeff ne ha fatto decollare il valore.

steve-jobs-seiko-watch-sells-at-auction-for-42500-12

Ora di nuovo un paio di segnatempo di Jobs fanno la loro comparsa sul web in un’asta on-line. Si tratta di un Baume & Mercier e di un altro Seiko al quarzo. Questi due orologi, entrambi risalenti ai primi anni ’80, sono certamente appartenuti a Jobs ma non godono dell’aura sacra di essere stati immortalati da Seef nei suoi scatti storici.

Schermata 2016-09-04 alle 10.04.35Schermata 2016-09-04 alle 10.04.45

L’asta pubblica sarà aperta il 23 settembre. Ora il Baume & Mercier è quotato a $ 5,500 con 12 offerte, mentre il Seiko è a $ 3,750 con 7 offerte.

Assieme a questi due orologi l’asta comprende altre memorabilia come un giubbotto in pelle, un libro sui computer autografato da Steve Wozniak e un oggetto che mi ha destato una piccola riflessione: un lettore cd portatile. Ho pensato infatti a quanto Jobs odiasse quei dispositivi (e ciò è riportato sia sulla sua biografia che nei due film di recente uscita) ed il fatto che ne sia sopravvissuto uno mi ha lasciato un po’ perplesso. Quanti ne avrà cestinati perché ne sia avanzato uno? Quante di queste macchinette sono state sacrificate sull’altare dell’iPod? Schermata 2016-09-04 alle 10.17.30

 

WORLD AUCTION RECORD FOR AN OMEGA SPEEDMASTER

The TOP LOT for the sale was an exceptional and historically important Apollo 17 privately flown OMEGA SPEEDMASTER stainless steel chronograph, from the personal collection of Astronaut Ron Evans. Manufactured in 1970 and including a flown Velcro strap and Fisher Space Pen, which realized $245,000.

Christie’s is proud to announce that the OMEGA Museum was the winning bidder and it will soon be on public display.

A unique Omega Speedmaster for sale at Omega Speedmaster 50 auction – Christie’s New York 15 December 2015

Flown to the moon: A unique Omega Speedmaster

A watch that accompanied Captain Ron Evans, one of only 24 people to have flown to the Moon, aboard Apollo 17 — a unique opportunity for collectors to own a flown Speedmaster from the Apollo missions

watch
Omega. An exceptional, highly attractive and historically important Apollo 17 privately flown stainless steel chronograph wristwatch and flown metal attachment from the personal collection of astronaut Ron Evans. Certified and signed. Manufactured in 1970. Estimate on request. This lot is offered in the Omega Speedmaster 50 sale on 15 December at Christie’s New York

Captain Ron Evans was one of 19 astronauts specially selected by NASA in April 1966 as part of ‘Astronaut Group 5’. Evans was serving in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific at the time, flying fighter aircraft in Vietnam combat operations from the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Ticonderoga.

Born in Kansas in 1933, Ronald E. Evans received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Kansas before joining the U.S. Navy. Between 1961 and 1962 he served as a combat flight instructor, and went on to earn a Master of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1964.Ronald_Evans-2

After being selected as member of the astronaut support crews for the Apollo 7 and Apollo 11 missions, and as backup command module pilot for Apollo 14, Evans made his first journey into space during Apollo 17, which launched on 7 December 1972. He was chosen as command module pilot, alongside crewmates Commander Eugene Cernan, who was making his third and final spaceflight, and Lunar Module Pilot Harrison H Schmitt, who became the first scientist to fly in space.

As the last scheduled manned mission to the Moon, Apollo 17 broke several records set by previous fights, including longest manned lunar landing flight, largest lunar sample return, and longest time in lunar orbit. In addition, important tests were undertaken for the continued development of space processing, which exploits the unique environment of a space laboratory to research, develop, and manufacture products.

Among these tests was one named ‘Apollo 17 Heat Flow and Convection Experiments’, which was carried out by Evans while on his way to the Moon, using the watch offered here, along with the metal part it was attached to. Given that all other known Speedmaster watches flown in space during the Apollo missions are property of NASA, this watch offers collectors the only opportunity to own a flown Speedmaster from the Apollo missions.

full-lot
The historically important Apollo 17 privately flown stainless steel Omega Speedmaster chronograph wristwatch from the personal collection of astronaut Ron Evans, alongside other elements included in this lot, such as the strap, the flown metal attachment used during the experiments, Apollo 17-flown Fisher AG 7 space pen, photographs and letters of verification. This lot is offered in the Omega Speedmaster 50 sale on 15 December at Christie’s New York

Cernan and Schmitt landed on the Moon in the Taurus-Littrow Valley shortly before 3pm EST on 11 December, before spending just over three days on the lunar surface. Above them in the Command/Service module, Evans would set a record for the time he spent alone in lunar orbit.

One of the most exciting discoveries of Cernan and Schmitt’s time on the Moon’s surface took place on day two of exploration. Nearly 9 km away from the Lunar Module, they came towards a crater that they named Shorty, in which they found an unusual and surprising orange soil literally underneath their feet.

Noticeable against the grey debris from the surface that surrounded it, it was later discovered that the orange soil was titanium-rich pyroclastic glass believed to have been deposited billions of years ago. This ultimately proved that the valley had previously witnessed a large eruptive fire.

On December 14, the spacecraft began its descent back home to Earth. Before the astronauts began their return, however, Cernan and Schmitt left behind a plaque engraved with the signatures of the three astronauts and President Richard Nixon. It read: ‘Here man completed his first explorations of the Moon December 1972, AD. May the spirit of peace in which we came be reflected in the lives of all mankind.’

ronald-evans-spacewalk
A detail of the photograph of Ronald Evans during his spacewalk on the way home from the Moon — and wearing the watch and strap shown above — which is offered as part of this lot in the Omega Speedmaster 50sale on 15 December at Christie’s New York
During the trip home, Evans had to retrieve film canisters from cameras mounted in the equipment bay at the rear of the spacecraft. To do this he was required to perform a spacewalk that lasted for one hour and six minutes, the last ever conducted in deep space. An original black and white photo released by NASA on 27 December 1972 shows Ron Evans wearing the watch strap offered with this lot on his left arm while working outside the spacecraft. This is also a unique opportunity to own one of the NASA-issued velcro straps used during the Apollo missions, as others were returned to NASA.

After 301 hours and 51 minutes in space, Evans and his crewmates returned to Earth on 19 December 1972. The Command Module landed in the Pacific Ocean, some four miles from the designated the recovery ship — the U.S.S. Ticonderoga, the aircraft carrier on which Evans had served four tours of duty. Fifty-two minutes after landing, Evans, Cernan and Schmitt were safely on board, having been retrieved by a recovery helicopter.

Once back on terra firma, Ron Evans took a portable hand engraving tool and inscribed the Speedmaster watch shown here, and the black metal attachment used in the experiment. On the reverse of the watch, he etched ‘FLOWN IN C.S.M. TO THE MOON’ and ‘APOLLO 17’ and his signature. On the edge of the watch he engraved ‘HEAT FLOW EXPR’ and ‘6-19 DEC 1972’. In addition, he etched directly on the metal piece that it was ‘glued to OMEGA watch’ for the experiment.

Left: Detail of the case back. Right: Detail of the side case engraving
Left: Detail of the case back. Right: Detail of the side case engraving

Evans went on to serve as backup command module pilot for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, which joined the United States and Soviet Union in an orbital mission, before retiring from the United States Navy on in 1976 after 21 years of service. He remained active for NASA’s Space Shuttle Program and as a NASA astronaut, and was a member of the operations and training group within the astronaut office that was responsible for launch and ascent phases.

He eventually retired from NASA in March 1977 and became a coal industry executive. As a distinguished astronaut and aviator, he was presented with a number of awards including the NASA Distinguished Service Medal in 1973, the Johnson Space Center Superior Achievement Award in 1970, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal in 1973, the Vietnam Service Medal, and the Navy Commendation Medal with combat distinguishing service in 1966. In 1983, Evans was inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame. He passed away in April 1990 at 56 years of age. Seven years later, Ronald Evans was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame.

The watch offered in the sale is accompanied with signed letters from Jan Evans (Ron’s wife) certifying that the stainless steel OMEGA Speedmaster, the watch strap and the small black metal piece were flown to the Moon and used by her husband on Apollo 17 in December 1972; a colour photograph of the OMEGA Speedmaster fixed on the heat experimental equipment; an original black and white photo signed on the back by Ron Evans of his EVA on December 17 1972; and a colour version of the same image.

Additionally, the watch is accompanied by the Apollo 17-flown Fisher AG 7 space pen from the personal collection of astronaut Ron Evans. It is marked with the NASA numbers SEB 12100051-204 and SN 1131. This pen was specially designed by Paul C. Fisher (Fisher Pen Company) for NASA and could be used in any position, on any surface, underwater or in conditions of weightlessness thanks to its pressurised ink. It, too, is accompanied with a letter from Jan Evans.

The Ron Evans Gold Conquest

Omega. An exceptionally important and unique 18k gold chronograph wristwatch with bracelet, certification letter and box, made for astronaut Ronald E. Evans. Signed Omega, Speedmaster, Professional, no. 1007, Movement no. 27’769’532, case ref. 145022 69, manufactured in 1970. Estimate: $40,000-80,000. This lot is offered in the Omega Speedmaster 50 sale on 15 December at Christie’s New York
Omega. An exceptionally important and unique 18k gold chronograph wristwatch with bracelet, certification letter and box, made for astronaut Ronald E. Evans. Signed Omega, Speedmaster, Professional, no. 1007, Movement no. 27’769’532, case ref. 145022 69, manufactured in 1970. Estimate: $40,000-80,000. This lot is offered in the Omega Speedmaster 50 sale on 15 December at Christie’s New York
As a commemorative gesture to a number of NASA astronauts following the successful Apollo 11 mission, OMEGA produced a special limited edition wristwatch with a solid 18k gold dial, case, and bracelet. The watches are only produced in 1,014 examples, where 26, numbered 3 to 28, were offered at an astronaut banquet in Houston on November 25, 1969.

The appreciation dinner was attended by astronauts that were on duty at the time, and three watches were awarded posthumously to the crew of Apollo 1. Solely for the astronauts’ special timepieces, the case backs were engraved: ‘to mark man’s conquest of space and time, through time, on time’, with the name of the astronaut and his mission.

The watch above is engraved number 1007 and features this important case back, made especially for Ron Evans to commemorate his efforts on the Apollo 13 mission. Watches such as this and numbered 1001 to 1008 were presented in 1972 and 1973 to those astronauts who had not yet accomplished a space conquest in 1969, namely missions 14 to 17.

A manuscript by Alan Turing sold for $1,025,000 at Bonhams New York

Un manoscritto autografo di Alan Turing, il padre dell’informatica, è stato venduto per $1,025,000 alla Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams di New York il 13 aprile scorso. Una parte dei proventi sarà devoluta in beneficenza.

Cassandra Hatton, Senior Specialist in Fine Books and Manuscripts and the History of Science per Bonhams ha commentato, “Questo è un risultato meraviglioso e una testimonianza circa l’influenza che Alan Turing suscita ancora oggi. E’ stato un grande privilegio essere coinvolti in questa asta e siamo immensamente lieti che tutti i partecipanti abbiano colto il significato storico che accompagna la vendita di un oggetto così speciale”.

Four-rotor-enigma

Composto da 56 pagine contenute in un semplice notebook acquistato in una cartoleria a Cambridge, si tratta quasi certamente dell’unica testimonianza autografa di ampie dimensioni lasciataci in eredità da  Alan Turing. Risale al 1942, quando il matematico lavorava a Bletchley Park per decifrare il codice della famigerata Enigma e fornisce una notevole panoramica sul pensiero di un genio.

Come sappiamo Alan Turing si suicidò nel 1954 vittima di una profonda depressione conseguente al trattamento ormonale per “curare” la sua omosessualità. “Terapia” cui si sottopose come alternativa al carcere…

Nello stesso evento, una macchina Enigma Enciphering è stata aggiudicata alla cifra record di $ 269.000.

www.meridianae.com – info@meridianae.com

www.oredelmondo.com – info@oredelmondo.com


A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York, the 13th April. A portion of the proceeds from Bonhams and the vendor will be donated to charity. 

Cassandra Hatton, Senior Specialist in Fine Books and Manuscripts and the History of Science at Bonhams said, “This is a wonderful result and a fitting testament to Alan Turing’s impact and legacy. It has been a great privilege to have been involved in this sale and we are immensely pleased that all the people who bid for this unique item and indeed the wider public have recognized Turing’s importance and place in history”.

Made up of 56 pages contained in a simple notebook bought from a stationers in Cambridge, UK, it is almost certainly the only extensive autograph manuscript by Turing in existence. From internal evidence, it dates from 1942 when he was working at Bletchley Park to break the German Enigma Code, and provides remarkable insight into the thought process of a genius. As he writes in his distinctive hand: “The Leibniz notation  I find extremely difficult to understand in spite of it having been the one I understood the best once! It certainly implies that some relation between x and y has been laid down eg, y=x2+3x…” It was among the papers left by Turing in his will to his close friend and fellow mathematician, Robin Gandy. Turing committed suicide in 1954 as a consequence of the hormone treatment to ‘cure’ his homosexuality which he was undergoing as an alternative to imprisonment.

In the same sale, a rare 3-rotor German Enigma Enciphering Machine sold for a world record at auction price of $269,000

www.meridianae.com – info@meridianae.com

www.oredelmondo.com – info@oredelmondo.com

The Original Apple Watch. Pure Pop art

original-apple-watch

Il primo orologio Apple è praticamente dietro l’angolo, in quanto si prevede che sarà sul mercato entro la prossima estate. Tuttavia ciò che molti ignorano è che negli anni ’90 la azienda di Cupertino aveva già pensato a qualcosa di simile o meglio di più convenzionale: un orologio analogico. Ma la cosa più curiosa è che tra gli anni ‘80 e ‘90 la Apple aveva a catalogo altri gadget a completare il suo merchandising come pantaloncini, occhiali da sole ed altri beni associabili ad una vera e propria campagna di globalizzazione del proprio marchio.

 

Lo scorso agosto è riemerso in tutto il suo look anni ’90 quello che potrebbe essere considerato il primo Apple Watch della storia. Ovviamente, questo non ha nulla a che fare con lo Smart Watch che sta per invadere il mercato con due dimensioni di schermo e l’integrazione con l’iPhone. Infatti si tratta di un classico orologio al quarzo con lunetta blu in alluminio, quadrante bianco con quattro indici tondi in metallo cromato, il vecchio logo Apple ad ore dodici e lancette in stile Pop Art. Il tutto chiuso da un cinturino in gomma con incisa la scritta MacOs.

Questo gadget faceva parte di un offerta di upgrade del sistema operativo del Mac alla versione 7.5. Chi acquistava il pacchetto aveva l’orologio in omaggio e per questo le unità in circolazione non sono così numerose. Il collezionista che astutamente lo ripropone proprio quando sta per uscire il nuovo Apple Watch si aspetta certamente di realizzare un ottimo profitto.

By Manuel Galvez e Andrea Foffi

www.meridianae.com – info@meridianae.com

www.oredelmondo.com – info@oredelmondo.com


The first Apple watch is practically around the corner, as it is expected that it will be on the market by next summer. But what many do not know is that in the 90s the Cupertino company had already thought of something similar or more conventional: an analog watch. But the most curious thing is that between the 80s and 90s, the company had to catalog other gadgets to complete his merchandising such as shorts, sunglasses and other assets associated with a real campaign of globalization of its brand.

Last August has resurfaced in all its 90s look what could be considered the first Apple Watch of history. Obviously, this has nothing to do with the Smart Watch that is about to flood the market with two screen sizes and the integration with the iPhone. In fact it is a classic quartz watch with blue aluminum bezel, white dial with four indexes round chrome metal, the old Apple logo at twelve o’clock and hands in pop art style.

This gadget was part of a bid to upgrade the operating system on the Mac to version 7.5. Who bought the package had the watch as a gift and as a consequence the units in circulation are not so many. The collector who cunningly proposing it right when is coming out the new Apple Watch certainly expect that the price will only go up.

By Manuel Galvez e Andrea Foffi

www.meridianae.com – info@meridianae.com

www.oredelmondo.com – info@oredelmondo.com

Bonhams: The dramatic life of a memorable man in a hidden manuscript of Alan Turing, the man who decrypted Enigma

BONHAMS TO OFFER ALAN TURING’S HIDDEN MANUSCRIPT ON THE FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Mai come in questo momento la vita drammatica di un uomo memorabile riassume perfettamente la terribile situazione storica che stiamo vivendo. Una vita che Alan Turing ha speso combattendo contro l’omofobia, l’antisemitismo, l’odio religioso e la xenofobia. Aberrazioni sociali che oggi come allora risuonano più che mai attuali in un mondo che sembra non voler cambiare mai.

Alan Turing (1912-1954) è stato un matematico e scienziato britannico ampiamente considerato come il padre dell’informatica moderna. Durante la seconda guerra mondiale, Turing ha svolto un ruolo fondamentale alla Bletchley Park per decifrare il codice della famigerata Enigma.

Il 31 marzo 1952 Alan Turing fu arrestato per omosessualità e giudicato colpevole. Si suicidò nel 1954 come conseguenza del trattamento ormonale per “curare” la sua omosessualità, cui si era sottoposto come alternativa al carcere.

Una volta condannato, fu costretto a scegliere tra due anni di carcere o la castrazione chimica mediante assunzione di estrogeni. Per non finire in prigione, lo scienziato optò per la seconda alternativa. La depressione legata al trattamento e alla sua pubblica umiliazione fu, a parere di molti, il motivo determinante che lo condusse, il 7 giugno 1954, al suicidio.

Solamente il 10 settembre 2009 vi è stata una dichiarazione di scuse ufficiali da parte del governo inglese, formulata dal primo ministro Gordon Brown che ha riconosciuto che Alan Turing fu oggetto di un trattamento omofobico:

“Per quelli fra noi che sono nati dopo il 1945, in un’Europa unita, democratica e in pace, è difficile immaginare che il nostro continente fu un tempo teatro del momento più buio dell’umanità. È difficile credere che in tempi ancora alla portata della memoria di chi è ancora vivo oggi, la gente potesse essere così consumata dall’odio – dall’antisemitismo, dall’omofobia, dalla xenofobia e da altri pregiudizi assassini – da far sì che le camere a gas e i crematori diventassero parte del paesaggio europeo tanto quanto le gallerie d’arte e le università e le sale da concerto che avevano contraddistinto la civiltà europea per secoli. […] Così, per conto del governo britannico, e di tutti coloro che vivono liberi grazie al lavoro di Alan, sono orgoglioso di dire: ci dispiace, avresti meritato di meglio. » Il 24 dicembre 2013 la regina Elisabetta II elargì la grazia postuma per Alan Turing.

Venendo al cimelio che Bonhams mette in asta, si tratta di un manoscritto autografo composto da 56 pagine contenute in un semplice blocco notes acquistato in una cartoleria a Cambridge, Regno Unito. E’ quasi certamente l’unico documento autografo di una certa ampiezza di Turing e non è mai stato presentato pubblicamente. Risale al 1942, quando il matematico lavorava a Bletchley Park per decifrare il codice della macchina tedesca per la criptazione Enigma.

Questo manoscritto unico, è tra le carte lasciate da Turing nel suo testamento all’amico e collega matematico, Robin Gandy. Nel 1977, Gandy lasciò questi documenti presso l’archivio del King College, Cambridge (il vecchio College di Turing), dove da allora sono a disposizione degli studenti per le loro ricerche. Tutti tranne il blocco notes oggetto dell’asta. Infatti Gandy annotò nel blocco, nelle pagine centrali vuote, una sorta di diario onirico. Questa personale integrazione al contenuto originale è quindi il motivo per cui tale eccezionale reperto si rimasto nascosto tra i suoi effetti personali, fino alla sua morte.

Cassandra Hatton, Senior Specialist Bonhams per Fine Books and Manuscripts and the History of Science, ha aggiunto che questo documento risale al tempo in cui Turing era impegnato nel compito cruciale di decifrare il codice Enigma ed il suo contenuto offre una straordinaria panoramica del pensiero di una delle più grandi menti del XX secolo.

info on www.bonhmas.com


BONHAMS TO OFFER ALAN TURING’S HIDDEN MANUSCRIPT ON THE FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Never as in this moment the dramatic life of a memorable man perfectly summarizes the terrible historical situation we are experiencing. A life that Alan Turing spent fighting against homophobia, anti-Semitism, religious hatred and xenophobia. Social aberrations that now as then resonate more than ever actual in a world that never change.

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science is to be sold at Bonhams Fine Books & Manuscripts sale in New York on 13 April. The manuscript is expected to sell for at least seven figures and a portion of the proceeds from Bonhams and the vendor will be donated to charity.

Made up of 56 pages contained in a simple notebook bought from a stationers in Cambridge, UK, it is almost certainly the only extensive autograph manuscript by Turing in existence, and has never been seen in public. From internal evidence, it dates from 1942 when he was working at Bletchley Park to break the German Enigma Code, and provides remarkable insight into the thought process of a genius. As he writes in his distinctive hand: “The Leibniz notation  I find extremely difficult to understand in spite of it having been the one I understood the best once! It certainly implies that some relation between x and y has been laid down eg, y=x2+3x…”It was among the papers left by Turing in his will to his close friend and fellow mathematician, Robin Gandy. Turing committed suicide in 1954 as a consequence of the hormone treatment to ‘cure’ his homosexuality which he was undergoing as an alternative to imprisonment.

In 1977, Gandy deposited the papers at the Archive Centre at King’s College, Cambridge, Turing’s old college – where they have been available to scholars for research ever since. He did, however, retain one item – this manuscript. In the blank center pages of the notebook between Alan’s writing, Gandy wrote his dream journal. The contents of the journal are intensely personal, so it is not a surprise that he would want to keep the journal private, and in fact, it remained hidden amongst his personal effects until his death. As he wrote at the beginning of this journal, “It seems a suitable disguise to write in between these notes of Alan’s on notation, but possibly a little sinister; a dead father figure, some of whose thoughts I most completely inherited.”

Leading Turing scholar Andrew Hodges said, “Alan Turing was parsimonious with his words and everything from his pen has special value. This notebook shines extra light on how, even when he was enmeshed in great world events, he remained committed to free-thinking work in pure mathematics.” The award-winning film THE IMITATION GAME starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, is based on Hodges’ book Alan Turing: The Enigma. The movie was recently nominated for 8 Academy Awards, including for Best Picture, Best Director (Morten Tyldum), Best Actor (Cumberbatch) and Best Supporting Actress (Knightley).

Cassandra Hatton, Senior Specialist in Fine Books and Manuscripts and the History of Science at Bonhams said, “This manuscript dates from the time when Turing was engaged in the crucial task of breaking the Enigma Code. Its mathematical content gives an extraordinary insight into the working mind of one of the greatest luminaries of the 20th century. This is quite simply one of the most extraordinary pieces I have ever had the privilege to handle.”

Alan Turing (1912-1954) was a British mathematician and computer scientist widely considered to be the father of modern computing. During World War II, Turing did crucial work at Bletchley Park breaking the German Enigma Code. Turing was tried and found guilty of crimes of gross indecency for engaging in homosexual acts. He committed suicide in 1954 as a consequence of the hormone treatment to ‘cure’ his homosexuality which he was undergoing as an alternative to imprisonment. Turing is the subject of the award winning film The Imitation Game starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, which is based on the definitive biography Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges

info on www.bonhmas.com

Bonhams, New York: $905.000 for the Apple1 computer

New York. Come anticipato (post), l’asta Bonhams la “Storia della Scienza” si è conclusa con la vendita di un computer Apple1 per più di $905.000, quasi il doppio della sua stima, il che lo rende il “personal” più prezioso e caro della storia. L’ offerta vincente è andata a un rappresentante del Henry Ford Museum che ha sollevato la paletta dopo aver duellato a lungo con un offerente al telefono.

Cassandra Hatton, la specialist Bonhams ha commentato: “La condizione dell’Apple1 è eccellente, quindi c’era da aspettarselo un risultato del genere. Siamo entusiasti di aver infranto il record di vendita e siamo ancora più entusiasti del fatto che stia andando al Henry Ford Museum”.

L’Apple1 è ampiamente riconosciuto come il pioniere della rivoluzione dei personal computer, essendo il primo personal computer preassemblato mai venduto al mondo. Questo esemplare è uno dei 50 costruiti a mano per il ByteShop da Steve Wozniak nel garage di Steve Jobs nell’estate del 1976. A quel tempo solo una manciata di persone poteva intuire l’utilità di quell’archetipo di personal computer.

Centinaia di offerenti, per lo più provenienti dagli Stati Uniti ed Europa, hanno partecipato a questa asta. La prossima asta Bonhams per “Storia della Scienza” si terrà nel mese di ottobre il 2015.

http://www.bonhams.com/press_release/17720/


New York – The History of Science auction at Bonhams New York ended with the sale of the Apple-1 computer, which sold for $905,000, almost twice its high estimate, making it the world’s most valuable relic from the computer age. The winning bid went to a smiling representative from the Henry Ford Museum who triumphantly raised the paddle after battling it out with another interested party on the phone.

Cassandra Hatton, the senior specialist in charge of the auction comments on the success of the sale of the Apple-1, “The provenance on the Apple-1 is excellent and the condition is outstanding, so it was not surprising that it did so well. We are thrilled to have broken the world record for its sale, and are even more thrilled that it is going to a wonderful new home at the Henry Ford Museum.”

In addition to the beautifully intact motherboard, this Apple-1 comes with a vintage keyboard with pre-7400 series military spec chips, a vintage Sanyo monitor, a custom vintage power supply in wooden box, as well as two vintage tape-decks. The lot additionally includes ephemera from the Cincinnati AppleSiders such as their first newsletter “Poke-Apple” from February of 1979 and a video recording of Steve Wozniak’s keynote speech at the 1980 “Applevention.”

The Apple-1 is widely acknowledged as the herald of the personal computer revolution, being the first pre-assembled personal computer ever sold. This example is one of 50 hand-built for the ByteShop by Steve Wozniak in the summer of 1976 in Steve Jobs’ garage (or possibly his sister’s bedroom). At the time, only a handful of people could conceive of how a personal computer might be considered useful, let alone desirable. Now, not even 40 years later, it boggles the imagination to think of life without them.

Hundreds of bidders participated in this auction, a large majority coming from the United States and Europe. The next History of Science sale will be held in October 2015.

http://www.bonhams.com/press_release/17720/

Bonhams, Apple1 personal computer offered in New York

 

Apple1 Personal Computer
Apple1 Personal Computer

Il lotto più iconico offerto da Bonhams per la “Storia della Scienza” sarà all’asta il 22 ottobre a New York.

Si tratta di una storica motherboard Apple1, stimata tra i $ 300.000 e $ 500.000. Il suo arrivo annunciò al mondo l’alba della rivoluzione dei personal computer e la nascita di un marchio ed una azienda ora leggendari. Questo esemplare è uno dei 50 costruiti a mano per la ByteShop da Steve Wozniak nell’estate del 1976 nel garage Steve Jobs.

A quel tempo, solo una manciata di persone avrebbero intuito le immense potenzialità di quell’oggetto, ora, meno di 40 anni dopo, non possiamo immaginare la vita senza senza un computer. Il direttore del dipartimento di libri e manoscritti pregiati presso Bonhams a New York, Christina Geiger, ha detto, “E ‘un grande privilegio avere un esemplare di Apple1 all’asta. E’ in condizioni eccezionali”.

Questo esemplare fu acquistato nel 1980 da John Anderson, fondatore della AppleSiders di Cincinnati, che compresa l’importanza storica del pezzo, l’ha conservato in una bacheca di vetro. Questo Apple1 è stato spedito nell’agosto del 2014 all’esperto di Apple1, Corey Cohen. Cohen ha detto, “Questo è uno dei migliori esemplari di Apple1 che abbia mai visto” e ha aggiunto “non sono presenti modifiche o alterazioni”. Cohen è membro del consiglio di amministrazione del Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Museum al InfoAge Science Centre nel New Jersey.

Oltre alla scheda madre intatta, questo esemplare di Apple1 funziona con la sua tastiera originale, l’alimentatore e il monitor Sanyo. Il lotto comprende anche la prima newsletter “Poke-Apple” della AppleSiders datata febbraio 1979 e una registrazione video del discorso di Steve Wozniak del 1980 “Applevention.”

L’asta sarà in anteprima a San Francisco dal 19-21 settembre e a New York dal 18-22 ottobre. Per info https://www.bonhams.com/video/17458/


The most iconic lot offered by Bonhams for the “History of Science” will be auctioned on October 22 in New York. It is a historical motherboard Apple1, estimated at between $ 300,000 and $ 500,000. His arrival announced to the world the computer revolution and the birth of a brand and a company now legendary. This specimen is one of the 50 hand-built by Steve Wozniak for ByteShop in the summer of 1976 in the Steve Jobs’s garage.

At that time, only a handful of people would have realize the immense potential of that object, now, less than 40 years later, we can not imagine life without a computer. The director of the department of fine books and manuscripts at Bonhams in New York, Christina Geiger, said, “It’s a great privilege to have an Apple1 in auction. It’s in exceptional condition”.

This specimen was purchased in 1980 by John Anderson, founder of AppleSiders of Cincinnati, who realized the historical significance of the Apple1, he kept in a glass case. This Apple1 was sent in August of 2014 the Apple1 expert, Corey Cohen. Cohen said, “This is one of the best examples of Apple1 I’ve ever seen” and added “there are no modifications or alterations.” Cohen is a member of the board of the Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Museum at InfoAge Science Centre in New Jersey.

In addition to the motherboard intact, this Apple works with its original keyboard, power supply and Sanyo monitor. The lot also includes the first newsletter “Poke-Apple” of AppleSiders dated February 1979 and a video recording of the Steve Wozniak speech in 1980 “Applevention.”

The auction will be previewed in San Francisco from September 19 to 21 and in New York from October 18 to 22. For info https://www.bonhams.com/video/17458/

 

Mission Concorde 001: chasing the shadow of the moon

Una eclisse solare si verifica quando la Luna passa tra la Terra e il Sole, totalmente o parzialmente in modo da oscurare l’immagine del Sole per un osservatore sulla Terra. Il 30 giugno 1973 il Concorde 001, prototipo del leggendario supersonico civile, rimase nell’ombra della Luna per circa 74 minuti durante una eclissi solare totale. Un record storico.

E’ stato pilotato dal comandante André Turcat e dotato di attrezzature specializzate per studiare la corona solare. Si tratta di tre macchine fotografiche innestate ad una sorta di periscopio che a sua volta è collegato alla superficie superiore della fusoliera. Questo permette all’osservatore di poter “inseguire” l’eclisse in movimento.Le macchine fotografiche erano due reflex e una Hasselblad. Victor Hasselblad mise a punto questa celebre macchina durante la seconda guerra mondiale, quando fu incaricato dall’aeronautica reale svedese di sviluppare una macchina fotografica per delle riprese aeree. Dopo la guerra, la produzione di macchine fotografiche ad uso militare è stato covertito nella produzione per uso civile.Introdotta nel 1948, la Hasselblad 1600F si è trasformata in quel sistema fotografico che è considerato fra i migliori al mondo e, per questo, scelta da molti fotografi professionisti.

La Hasselblad è stata usata sin dalle prime missioni spaziali. Dalla prima, utilizzata nella missione del 3 ottobre 1962, le fotocamere Hasselblad sono state parte integrante del programma spaziale della NASA. Particolarmente noto è l’utilizzo di queste fotocamere nelle missioni del programma Apollo, sono Hasselblad le fotografie del primo passo dell’uomo sulla Luna. Per beneficiare della straordinaria velocità del Concorde, le squadre francesi guidate da Pierre Léna (astrofisico, membro dell’Accademia delle Scienze) e Serge Koutchmy più altri collaboratori a bordo, avevano a disposizione vari strumenti di misura e telecamere per monitorare l’ombra della Luna che si muoveva sopra il deserto del Sahara a una velocità di Mach 2 (oltre 2.200 km / 1.370 miglia all’ora) ad una altitudine di 17.000 metri (56.000 piedi), che permettono di moltiplicare per dieci la durata della totalità del fenomeno.

Volando dentro il cono d’ombra della Luna alla stessa velocità, il Concorde sarebbe rimasto nell’oscurità per quasi 74 minuti, il tempo per gli astronomi e fisici a bordo di completare tutte le rilevazioni che si potevano immaginare durante quell’incredibile periodo di sole nero. Sono stati in grado di raggiungere in un’ora e quindici minuti di osservazione quello che avrebbero impiegato osservatori a terra in quindici eclissi solari da luoghi che non necessariamente avrebbero ottenuto cielo sereno.

Per il 40° anniversario di questo storico volo, una mostra permanente è stata allestita e inaugurata al pubblico il 30 giugno 2013 presso “Le Bourget Air and Space Museum” di Parigi.

Dal libro, Concorde 001 et l’ombre de la Lune di Pierre Lena: “Questa estate 30 giugno 1973 mattina, il sole sorge sopra le Isole Canarie. L’eclissi del secolo è appena iniziata. Da ovest, l’ombra lunare copre la costa africana a più di 2000 km/h. Gli astronomi a terra potranno beneficiare di soli sette minuti di buio totale per studiare la corona solare. Troppo poco per Pierre Lena e i sette scienziati che si sono imbarcati sul Concorde 001, straordinario aereo che si appresta a debuttare nei cieli come primo supersonico per le rotte commerciali. Guidati dal comandante André Turcat ed il suo equipaggio fino a quota 17.000 metri, l’aereo rimane nell’ombra lunare per 74 minuti, una tempo di osservazione mai raggiunto e consentendo eccezionali rilevazioni”.

La scienza, la tecnologia, l’aviazione e la storia si combinano in un’avventura umana unica a bordo di un aereo leggendario, un’impresa che resterà nella storia.


Mission Concorde 001: chasing the shadow of the moon

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, totally or partially to obscure the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. On 30 June 1973, the Concorde 001, the prototype of the legendary supersonic, remained in the shadow of the moon for about 74 minutes during a total solar eclipse. A historical record.

It was piloted by Commander André Turcat and equipped with specialized equipment to study the solar corona. These three cameras grafted to a sort of periscope which in turn is connected to the upper surface of the fuselage. This allows the viewer to be able to “chase” the eclipse in movement. The cameras were two and a Hasselblad. Victor Hasselblad (its inventor) devised this famous machine during the Second World War, when he was commissioned by the Air Royal Swedish to develop a camera for aerial shots. After the war, the production of cameras for military use become civil. Introduced in 1948, the Hasselblad 1600F has evolved in the photographic system that is considered among the best in the world and, therefore, chosen by many professional photographers.

The Hasselblad was used since the early space missions. The first was used in the mission of October 3, 1962. Hasselblad cameras have been an integral part of the NASA space program. Particularly well known is the use of these cameras in the missions of the Apollo program, the photographs of man’s first step on the moon was an Hasselblad. To benefit from the extraordinary speed of the Concorde, the French teams led by Pierre Léna (astrophysicist, and member of the Academy of Sciences) and Serge Koutchmy with other collaborators on board, had a variety of measuring instruments and cameras to monitor the shadow of the Moon that moved over the Sahara desert at a speed of Mach 2 (2,200 km / 1,370 mph) at an altitude of 17,000 meters (56,000 feet), which allow you to multiply tenfold the duration of the totality of the phenomenon.

Flying in the shadow of the Moon at the same speed, the Concorde would remain in the dark for nearly 74 minutes, the time for astronomers and physicists on board to complete all the surveys that you could imagine during this incredible period of black sun. They were able to achieve in one hour and fifteen minutes of observation that would take observers on the ground in fifteen solar eclipses from places that do not necessarily have got clear skies.

For the 40th anniversary of this historic flight, a permanent exhibition has been set up and opened to the public in June 30, 2013 at “Le Bourget Air and Space Museum” in Paris.

From the book, Concorde 001 et l’ombre de la Lune by Pierre Lena: “This summer, June 30, 1973 morning, the sun rises over the Canary Islands. The eclipse of the century has just begun. From the west, the shadow of the moon covers the African coast to more than 2000 km/h. Astronomers on the ground will be eligible for only seven minutes of total darkness in order to study the solar corona. Too little to Pierre Lena and the seven scientists who boarded the Concorde 001, the extraordinary plane that is about to make his debut in the heavens as the first supersonic for trade routes. Led by Commander André Turcat and his crew to an altitude of 17,000 feet, the aircraft remains in the shadows Lunar 74 minutes, a period of observation never achieved and allowing exceptional surveys. ”

Science, technology, aviation and history combined in unique human adventure aboard a legendary aircraft, an enterprise that will go down in history.